out of hock

out of hock
not having debts, not owing any money
  

We paid off our mortgage today. It feels good to be out of hock.


English Idioms. Sayings and slang .

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  • get out of hock — go into/get out of hock ► to get into or get out of debt: » Until we either curb our appetite for imports or become a lot better at exporting, the more we trade the deeper we go into hock »Few believe that any legal action can yield the billions… …   Financial and business terms

  • go into/get out of hock — ► to get into or get out of debt: » Until we either curb our appetite for imports or become a lot better at exporting, the more we trade the deeper we go into hock »Few believe that any legal action can yield the billions that the company needs… …   Financial and business terms

  • hock — [hɒk ǁ hɑːk] noun informal FINANCE 1. in hock in debt: • The newspaper is now in hock to a group of business tycoons. • The Egyptian economy was effectively in hock. 2. go into hock to go into debt …   Financial and business terms

  • hock — hock1 [häk] n. [S Brit var. of Scot hough < ME hoh, heel < OE < Gmc * hanha, HEEL1, with loss of nasal as in SOFT, TOOTH] 1. the joint bending backward in the hind leg of a horse, ox, etc., corresponding to the human ankle: see HORSE 2.… …   English World dictionary

  • Hock — Hock, n. 1. The state of having been pawned; usually preceded by in; as, all her jewelry is in hock. [PJC] 2. The state of being in debt; as, it took him two years to get out of hock. [PJC] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • hock — I. /hɒk / (say hok) noun 1. the joint in the hind leg of the horse, etc., above the fetlock joint, corresponding to the ankle in humans but raised from the ground and protruding backwards when bent. 2. a corresponding joint in a fowl. 3. a cut of …  

  • hock — I. noun Etymology: Middle English hoch, hough, from Old English hōh heel; akin to Old Norse hāsin hock Date: 1540 1. a. the tarsal joint or region in the hind limb of a digitigrade quadruped (as the horse) corresponding to the human ankle but… …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • hock — 1. tv. to pawn something. □ I tried to hock my watch to get some money. □ I’ve got nothing left to hock. 2. n. the state of having been pawned. (Usually with in.) □ My watch is already in hock …   Dictionary of American slang and colloquial expressions

  • hock — hock1 /hok/, n. 1. the joint in the hind leg of a horse, cow, etc., above the fetlock joint, corresponding anatomically to the ankle in humans. See diag. under horse. 2. a corresponding joint in a fowl. v.t. 3. to hamstring. [1375 1425; var. of… …   Universalium

  • hock — I v (1) Being pawned. (2) Debt. Hardy Spender went into hock to buy that new car of his. 1860s II v To pawn. Billy hocked his guitar to get his watch out of hock. 1900s …   Historical dictionary of American slang

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